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Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)
, which is understandable. and then some people just don't like the concept because they think we would attract crazy people and they don't want crazy people in their building. >> the clients run the gamut, from construction workers to administrative assistants. from bheem are angry at their bosses to people who want exercise. >> is there something you're angry about or here for fun? >> i'm here for fun. i can probably think of things that make me mad. >> we all can. i was saying i've been on the phone with the dmv for an hour. i was angry when i got in there. >> the stuff to destroy comes from the street. making it cost effective. >> people constantly have trash every day all day. we use all of that. we go on pickup days and we pick up the large items that people don't want anymore or can't be used anymore. those are the items that we use to operate off of. >> today the anger room has three rooms that can be set up like anything you want. but donna sees this as just the start of -- >> if all goes well, in five years, i think you'll see a huge facility, 10,000 square feet, loud announce
, nearby works in towns in seattle and -- it only lists locally independently owned businesses. >> we don't look at it as competing against the big box. they might want adventures and services that literally they can't get anywhere else. we see ourselves as a nice complement to existing gift registri registries. >> companies may a startup fee and transaction fees. customers can add items to their registries. it's attracting customers who care about shopping small. >> my fiancee is 30 and i'm 29. we have all this stuff we can use. when we started about what we would want from a registry, it was more things around us and things to do, experiences. things to support our community. we think it's so much more about who we are than just a set of plates from a big box store would be. this is about what we do and what we value and it's free. >> how did allison get business toss sign on? she teamed up with organizations that have a similar local mind-set. >> the local shopping movement is a thing. it's real. but it's been around forever. there are local business groups everywhere from chambers to
first class. priority mail. certified. international. and the mail man picks it up. i don't leave the shop anymore. [ male announcer ] get a 4 week trial plus $100 in extras including postage and a digital scale. go to stamps.com/tv and never go to the post office again. >>> her accessory company was booming, so it was time to hire the right sales rep. >>> and main street east greenwich, rhode island. find out what they are doing to get customers to shop local, coming up next on "your business." ♪ >> small businesses are revitalizing the economy and american express open is here to help. we are proud to present your business on msnbc. >>> hi, there, everyone. i'm jj ramberg and welcome to "your business," the show that champions entrepreneurship and gives you tips and advice to help your small business grow. selling a product or a service that you created, one that's your baby, can be easy, because it comes straight from your heart. getting other people to sell it with as much passion, well, that's a big ask. today we introduce you to the company la loop and its founder, elizabe
into sales because they want to make money. right? i don't think you can ever go wrong as doing this through money. but it's part of making them a part of this venture. particularly when introducing a new product, it's that you get to be part of this pioneering team that's going to bring this product to stores throughout america or throughout the world. so i think if you get them wrapped up in their heart in making an impact, that really helps as well. >> i think, also, reba, this idea, and you said bringing a part of the team, not just you have sales people, you send them off, but you constantly are in touch with them and making them feel like they're not independent but rather a part of your company? >> right. >> exactly. particularly in the early stages, and that could be the first five years or something. sort of like she said. go on a sales call with them and that video i think is a brilliant idea so it's you and them together. you're not just sort of casting off this manufacturers' rep. >> tell me, how you started, i imagine you sold yourself when you started your company? >> yes, sold
's basically just me and i don't go to the shows anymore. if somebody wants to have my stuff in their store, they have to come to me. it means that, you know, it's sort of at zero growth in a way. and i've learned to think that that's not such a bad thing. >> her simpler business is now set up so it carries not only her line but a bunch of other unique small batch designers as well. many of them local like herself and with less pressure for constant growth, she's able to step away when she'd like to, to go back to acting. >> i can go off and do a project and come back to this. this will always be here. this is a stable resource. it doesn't belong to anybody else. nobody can take it away from me. nobody can tell me i can't do it or that i didn't get the job or something like that. >> karen allen's business is just one much many on great barrington's main street. a beautiful town tucked away from the berkshires. that busy stretch of road is about to get a major facelift fixing sidewalks, replacing trees and repaving the road. just 2 1/2 hours from boston and new york, the downtown there as an
in new hampshire and seattle, and only list local independently owned bases. >> we don't look at it as competing against the big box, we look at it as supporting another part of what people want. so they might want adventures and they might want services that literally they can't get anywhere else. we see ourselves as a nice complement to existing gift registries. >> here's how it works. company pay a start-up fee to be listed and transaction fees. customers can add items from these stores to their registries. it's attracting companies who care about shopping small. >> my fiance is 30. i'm 29. we have all of the stuff we want to use, we started to think what we want from the registry it's more things around us and things to do, experiences and things to support our community. i think it's 0 so much more about who we are than just a set of plates of what a big box store would be. this is about what we do and what we value. >> so, how did allison get businesses to sign on? she teamed up with organizations that have a similar local mind set. >> the local shopping movement is real
shop. i don't feel that people going to another store is competition for me. look -- >> as long as it's in nyack. >> that's right, because i want people to come back here. their first coffee of the day could be down the street, the second here, i don't care, ozlong as they're staying here. that benefits me and the other merchants as well. >> owner of the gallery of metal and stone. 20 yoears in nyack. >> do you do a lot of shopping local? when you shop, will you be up and down the street? >> yes, i do. we try to be here for each other, and if someone can't find something here, i'll tell them to go to the jewelry store down the block. if they can't find it here, why shouldn't they find it in another shop in town. >> jack, 38 years in nyack. >> a book store is kind of the quintessential store that has disappeared from main streets across america. how have you survived? >> i think it's basically because i get here early in the morning and work and stay here until late at night. that's how it works. >> no, that's not how it works. >> yes. >> you're very casual about your success. >> but t
one day and another coffee shop another day but still go to a coffee shop. i don't feel people going to another store is a competition for me. >> as long as it's in nyack. >> that's right. i want people to come back here. their first coffee of the day can be down the street. the second cup of coffee. it doesn't bother me as long as it's here. >> identify been 20 years in nyack. >> do you do your shopping in nyack. >> yes. we try to be there for each other and believe it or not if somebody can't find something here i'll tell them to go the jewelry store down the block. if they can't find it here why shouldn't they be able to find it another shop in the town. >> 38 years in nyack. >> a book store is the kind of quintessential store that's disappeared from main street america. how have you survived? >> basically because i get here early in the morning and work and stay here until late at night. that's how it works. >> no. you're very casual about your success. >> that's how it works. really. you have to be there. you have to pay attention to customers. be part of the fabric of the commu
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)